Marry Young

Young adults have increasingly come to see marriage as a ‘capstone’ rather than a ‘cornerstone’—that is, something they do after they have all their other ducks in a row, rather than as a foundation for launching into adulthood and parenthood.”

Marriage actually works best as a formative institution, not an institution you enter once you think you’re fully formed. We learn marriage, just as we learn language, and to the teachable, some lessons just come easier earlier in life. It’s important, of course, that people enter into marriage with some level of maturity and self-possession, for one’s own sake and that of the other person. But the greatest gift of marriage… is the formation that occurs through the give and take of living in lifelong communion with another.

An excerpt from “The case for getting married young” by Karen Swallow Prior

Marriage wasn’t something we did after we’d grown up—it was how we have grown up and grown together.

Marriage doesn’t require a big bank account, a dazzling resumé, or a televised wedding—it requires maturity, commitment, and a desire to grow up together.

An excerpt from “I married young” by Julia Shaw

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